Category Archives: Installation

#Carbonfeed

The project #CarbonFeed directly challenges the popular notion that virtuality is disconnected from reality.  Through sonifying Twitter feeds and correlating individual tweets with a physical data visualization in public spaces, artists Jon Bellona and John Park invite viewers to hear and see the environmental cost of online behavior and its supportive physical infrastructure.

CarbonFeed works by taking in realtime tweets from Twitter users around the world. Based on a customizable set of hashtags, the work listens for specific tweets. The content of these incoming tweets generates a realtime sonic composition. An installation-based visual counterpart of compressed air being pumped through tubes of water further provides a physical manifestation of each tweet.

To see a running counter of the carbon footprint of digital behavior, learn more about this project or even listen to a song based on your personal twitter feed, please visit http://carbonfeed.org

#Carbonfeed installed at the University of Virginia.
#Carbonfeed installed at the University of Virginia.

Human Chimes

Human Chimes transforms users into sound that bounce between other users inside the space. The sounds infer interaction with all other participants inside the space. Participants perceive themselves and others as transformed visual components projected onto the front wall as well as sonic formulations indicating where they are. As people move, the sounds move and change to show changing personal interactions. As more users enter the space, more sounds are layered upon the existing body. In this way, sound patterns, like our relationships with others, continuously evolve.

The social work dynamically tracking users’ locations in real time, transcoding participants as sounds that pan around the space according to the participants’ positions. Human Chimes enables users to create, control, and interact with sound and visuals in real time. The piece uses a multimedia experience to ignite our curiosity and deepen our playful attitude with the world around us.

The work was commissioned in part by the University of Oregon and the city of Eugene, Oregon. The work was presented as part of the (sub)Urban Projections film festival: Nov. 9, 2011.

                       

Graffiti

(sub)Urban Projections Film Festival wanted to include live projection bombing in downtown Eugene, OR, and I was commissioned to create an interactive installation that allows a user to paint graffiti upon any projected surface. The human interface uses TouchOSC on an iPad or iPhone, which drives my graffiti computer software. The work was presented each night of the (sub)Urban Projections festival: Nov. 9, 16, 23; 2011, the WhiteBox gallery in Portland, OR Dec. 10, 2011, and the second (sub)Urban Projections festival: Nov. 7, 11, 14 2012.

Play! Sequence

Play! Sequence is a multimedia installation for iPod Touch, USB camera, and VGA video display and TouchOSC, Max/MSP/Jitter, and Isadora software applications. By creating a multitouch sequencer that controls the playback of audio and video masks, Play! Sequence enables the user to simultaneously interact with the space’s sonic and visual environment.

The iPod Touch provides a familiar language for the user and for the nature of the tactile interactions. The user is allowed to create, edit, and delete three synchronous sequences of sixteen steps, thereby changing the evolution and the complexity of the piece over time.

Each of the three sequences represent a sonic timbre and color mask that mirror the user’s actions. With each sonic timbre, the user has control over pitch, rhythm, and amplitude. The color masks follow the sounds across the screen, repeating from the left upon the start of each loop. The masks help visualize the user’s tactile and sound experience by revealing the user inside the space, and each mask represents one of elements in the RGB color model.

Play! Sequence operates within the framework of natural human interaction, playing off of our curiosity and our engagement with objects that we can creatively control. The user manipulates and interacts with the sounds and visuals in real time, driven by the immediate feedback that the system provides.

The Goddess Re:Membered

Commissioned for the 2011 Fringe Festival, The Goddess Re:membered is a site specific work and multimedia response to The Goddess, a classic Chinese silent film from 1934. The interactive installation is for video projection, IR camera, Max/MSP and Isadora software. Through public interactions of users inside the space, clues to distant memories are revealed through the triggering of color, sound, and video masks.

Patch It In!

Patch It In! is an interactive sound installation focused on illuminating the transformations of space through human presence. The installation explores the physical and aural transformations of space through the activity of the viewer. Prerecorded sounds can be manipulated by the viewer as well as dirt rings existing inside the space. Human interaction and decision informs the work.

The viewer leaves having altered the space in some way, however big or small, whether seen or felt, and they have viewed other’s alterations of space. The installation, once defined by the artist, is ultimately transformed, being defined instead by the multiple interactions of viewers inside the work.

+ Read the entire Artist Statement.

Boxed

Boxed is a sound installation about the journeys of shipping cardboard boxes. The work includes seven vignettes, or rather “boxes,” that utilize sounds of packing & shipping cardboard freight as source material. Projected from inside a box, the work fills a perceptual empty container as one listens from within this box to other boxes undergoing various journeys.

+ Read the entire Artist Statement.

Vietnam War Sound Memorial

The Sound Memorial for the Veterans of the Vietnam War is a six-hour long composition, a reading of the names of the service members who died during the Vietnam War. The Sound Memorial is a fixed media work performed as an eight-speaker installation and is composed from 210+ voices and over 200 hours of recording. The memorial resurrects the service member’s names by propagating them within a defined space, allowing the name to reverberate within a room and take on a whole new life. The first audio excerpt is “Height of the War;” the movement attempts to capture the magnitude of American service members killed in action over the course of several months in 1968. Following this movement is the rest of the piece, playing sequentially from the beginning.

+ Download the score.

+ Project Site